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If you are interested in posting a clinical trial, please email info@ascpp.org.

PAR-14-107 First in Human and Early Stage Clinical Trials of Novel Investigational Drugs or Devices for Psychiatric Disorders (U01)


RFA-MH-15-300
Exploratory Clinical Trials of Novel Interventions for Mental Disorders (R21/R33)


RFA-MH-15-310
Exploratory Clinical Trials of Novel Interventions for Mental Disorders (R33)


RFA-MH-15-320
Clinical Trials to Test the Effectiveness of Treatment, Preventive, and Services Interventions (R01)


RFA-MH-15-325
Clinical Trials to Test the Effectiveness of Treatment, Preventive, and Services Interventions (Collaborative R01)


RFA-MH-15-330
Pilot Effectiveness Studies and Services Research Grants (R34)


  • Posted September 9, 2013 - The National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics  For pregnant women between the ages of 18 and 45 and are currently treated with one or more of the following atypical antipsychotics:

     Abilify (aripiprazole)
     Clozaril (clozapine)
     Geodon (ziprasidone)
     Invega (paliperidone)
     Risperdal (risperidone)
     Seroquel (quetiapine)
     Zyprexa (olanzapine)
     Saphris (asenapine)
     Fanapt (iloperidone)
     Latuda (lurasidone)

This study will involve 3 brief phone interviews over an 8-month period. The National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics is dedicated to evaluating the safety of atypical antipsychotic medications that may be taken by women during pregnancy to treat a wide range of mood, anxiety, or psychiatric disorders. The primary goal of this Registry is to determine the frequency of major malformations, such as heart defects, cleft lip, or neural tube defects, in infants exposed to atypical antipsychotics during pregnancy. To register or for more information, please call 1-866-961-2388.

  • Posted September 9, 2013 –  Symptom Tracking in Assisted Reproductive Technologie (START Study) Are you planning infertility treatment? Do you have a history of depression or bipolar disorder? You may be eligible for a research study at the Center for Women’s Mental Health at Massachusetts General Hospital. We are conducting a study of the course of mood throughout infertility treatment cycles.  This is an observational study that tracks women’s mood symptoms over a period of six months.  Study participation includes monthly visits to the Center for Women’s Mental Health and infertility treatment diaries to be completed at home.  The study has been tailored to meet the needs of the individual participant and can also be completed remotely for those women who do not live locally or who are unable to commit to clinic visits.  Those eligible for the study include all women with a history of major depression or bipolar depression currently in remission who are planning or are under going infertility treatment. For more information, please call Shannon Murphy at 617-643-5154 or e-mail skmurphy@partners.org. *If you are interested in participating in the START Study and would like to be contacted by our research coordinator, you can also submit your contact information using our patient interest form. All information is kept strictly confidential.
  • Posted August 28, 2013 - The STEADi clinical research study for adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) The purpose of the STEADi (Study To Evaluate an Adolescent Depression Investigational drug) clinical research study is to find out if an investigational drug is safe and to see if it works for adolescents who have MDD. Girls and boys who are 12 to 17 years old and have been diagnosed with MDD or who have been feeling depressed for at least the past 6 weeks may be eligible to participate in the study. The study will last for about 10 weeks. A parent or consenting caregiver will need to come with your child to the study doctor’s office about 9 times. About 500 adolescents will take part in the study, which is being done at about 60 study centers across the United States. To see if your child may qualify, visit www.steadiresearchstudy.com or call 877-900-8735.